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This Week in #CivicTech: Remembering Activist Sabeen Mahmud

The Code for America network is made up of more than 16,000 people around the world who help make their communities and governments work better. Here’s a brief snapshot of what happened across the network this week:

Remembering Sabeen Mahmud

Organizers of Karachi Civic Hackathon 2013 at T2F. From left to right: Sabeen Mahmud, Jehan Ara, Sheba Najmi.

Code for Pakistan and the global civic tech movement lost a fearless activist this week. Sabeen, 39, was the first person to believe in and throw her support behind Code for Pakistan, according to a post on Code for Pakistan’s blog. The prominent human rights activist was gunned down as she left the arts center she founded. Read about Sabeen’s legacy >

Two Brigades Map Free Lunches for Students in Baltimore

vast majority of Baltimore’s 85,000 public school students are eligible for free and reduced-priced meals, and the city’s school closings Tuesday left thousands of children without access to that food.  Code for DC and Code for Boston created an app so Baltimore students could find free lunches around the city. See what they built >

Mapping Nepal

In the days since the earthquake in Nepal, thousands of humanitarian mappers at Mapbox and beyond have sprung into action to fill in map gaps in the affected areas. In addition to the 3,960 previously mapped miles of roads and 182,706 buildings, more than 2,000 mappers have recorded 13,199 new miles of roads and 110,681 new buildings. Learn how you can help >

Code for Australia Launches a Fellowship Program

Use your skills for good in Australia! The Code for Australia fellowship program sends teams of experienced technologists, designers and community organizers into local and state governments across the country to work full-time for a year in partnership with government officials. [The Code for America network is made up of more than 16,000 people around the world who help make their communities and governments work better. Here’s a brief snapshot of what happened across the network this week:

Remembering Sabeen Mahmud

Organizers of Karachi Civic Hackathon 2013 at T2F. From left to right: Sabeen Mahmud, Jehan Ara, Sheba Najmi.

Code for Pakistan and the global civic tech movement lost a fearless activist this week. Sabeen, 39, was the first person to believe in and throw her support behind Code for Pakistan, according to a post on Code for Pakistan’s blog. The prominent human rights activist was gunned down as she left the arts center she founded. Read about Sabeen’s legacy >

Two Brigades Map Free Lunches for Students in Baltimore

vast majority of Baltimore’s 85,000 public school students are eligible for free and reduced-priced meals, and the city’s school closings Tuesday left thousands of children without access to that food.  Code for DC and Code for Boston created an app so Baltimore students could find free lunches around the city. See what they built >

Mapping Nepal

In the days since the earthquake in Nepal, thousands of humanitarian mappers at Mapbox and beyond have sprung into action to fill in map gaps in the affected areas. In addition to the 3,960 previously mapped miles of roads and 182,706 buildings, more than 2,000 mappers have recorded 13,199 new miles of roads and 110,681 new buildings. Learn how you can help >

Code for Australia Launches a Fellowship Program

Use your skills for good in Australia! The Code for Australia fellowship program sends teams of experienced technologists, designers and community organizers into local and state governments across the country to work full-time for a year in partnership with government officials.](http://www.codeforaustralia.org/fellowship/)

How Residents are Shaping the New South Downtown Atlanta

A city’s downtown is its heart and soul. The southern part of downtown Atlanta has seen better days. Formerly vibrant streets remain deserted while shops and restaurants struggle to stay in business. Code for Atlanta worked with the Center for Civic Innovation on a website that asks community members to help shape the vision for a better South Downtown. Learn more >

Code for KC Partners with UMKC Law School

Code for KC is partnering with the University of Missouri-Kansas City to build apps that help real estate developers get city zoning permits quickly and efficiently, protect user privacy online, and much more. Learn about their partnership >

Want to get involved ? Register for a National Day of Civic Hacking event >