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CodeAcross 2015 #debrief

CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** -](http://www.meetup.com/CodeForDenver/events/219598454/) - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** -](http://www.meetup.com/CodeForDenver/events/219598454/) -](https://hackpad.com/Seattle-Open-Data-Day-R3eOkJdS2yN) - Code for San Francisco partnered with the Housing Coalition to propose Affordable Housing Projects 3. **Brigades ate carbs.**[CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** -](http://www.meetup.com/CodeForDenver/events/219598454/) - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** - [CA agenda

When Code for Birmingham’s Brigade Captain, Tait Wayland was asked to describe their 2015 CodeAcross event using one word he asked, “Does ‘game-changing’ count? Our hackathon was too awesome for one word!”  The same can be said for the over 60 community events that took place in honor of CodeAcross 2015 - they were all just too awesome for words!

As we combed through the projects and partnerships from the hackers holiday, it’s clear that CodeAcross 2015 is just the beginning of what is shaping up to be a truly impactful year of civic hacking.

To all those who participated in the weekend, thank you! Here’s a snapshot of what you accomplished.

CodeAcross 2015 by the Numbers

  • 60 participating locations across the globe (13 international events)
  • 3,162 participants *
  • 36,900 volunteer hours contributed *
  • 26 cities evaluated 238 local digital services
  • 22  events pushed code
  • 26 events opened data at CodeAcross
  • 16 events advanced open data policy
  • 26 events collaborated with community organizations

 

  1. Brigades hacked with local gov and community orgs.**

** -](https://twitter.com/cydharrell/status/569204931820826624) - Tucson and Richmond redeployed “ Honolulu Answers”, “A new approach to a city website, designed to make it easier for people to find city information and services quickly.”

- Code for Boston created “[MBTA Ninja](http://www.mbta.ninja/)”, “No more guessing what “minor delays” means, get realtime updates from fellow T (subway) riders.”   2. **Brigades taught and discussed All the Things.****

** -](http://www.meetup.com/CodeForDenver/events/219598454/) -](https://hackpad.com/Seattle-Open-Data-Day-R3eOkJdS2yN) - Code for San Francisco partnered with the Housing Coalition to propose Affordable Housing Projects 3. **Brigades ate carbs.](http://www.codeforamerica.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/carbscodeacross.jpg.jpg) carbscodeacross.jpg 4. **Brigades used CodeAcross as the kickoff for a year of impact.

From Melbourne to Minneapolis, CodeAcross was just the beginning for each local Brigade. Whether building relationships or starting  projects, Brigades will continue building on the momentum from CodeAcross at hack nights and National Day of Civic Hacking.

CodeAcross Snapshots: Austin, Boston, Burlington

After looking at CodeAcross data, I wanted to learn more about what was significant for communities at the local level. To help answer this question, I reached out to organizers in Austin, Boston, and Burlington to learn how their event has evolved from years past and what impact CodeAcross 2015 had for their Brigade.

open austin photo photo creadit @ginahelfrich

 

Open Austin: An Anchor for 2015

The goal of Open Austin’s CodeAcross was to “produce a collection of plans for projects that could anchor a year-long civic hacking effort.”

Brigade Delivery Lead, Mateo Clarke says that this format, and the use of their Project Canvas, allowed for this year’s event to have a more participatory environment.

“Our Code Across weekend was really hands-on and inclusive because it  wasn’t hyper focused on coding, but instead on design thinking and  project planning,” said Clarke.

Mateo and Open Austin Captain, Chip Rosenthal agree that that “problem-solving” sums up their local event, and point to the partnership with Councilman Greg Casar as their “thing to watch.” Together with the Austin City Council, Open Austin plans to digitize a map that indicated the very best locations for the city to landscape parks, based on open population and neighborhood data about the number of children and multifamily units that have no yards.

Code for Boston: Designing for People’s Needs

Code for Boston turned a jarring month of record snowfall into an inspiration for projects during CodeAcross 2015. According to Brigade Captain Harlan Weber the “thing to watch” out of CodeAcross is MBTA.Ninja. This  crowdsourcing app for reporting and viewing MBTA (Boston Subway) delays generated tons of buzz as it was a very timely resource for the relentless snowy weather. News of the app was picked up by Boston MagazineBoston Metro, the Boston Globe, and CBS News.

Code for Boston focused this year’s CodeAcross on starting projects rather than racing to finish projects over this one hectic weekend.  “Using CodeAcross as a kickoff for our 2015 slate of Brigade projects has been pretty successful and has brought fresh ideas, new members, and new projects into our community,” said Weber.

Screen Shot 2015-03-10 at 12.40.54 PM

Code for Burlington: Building Community

Code for Burlington took a different approach to CodeAcross and hosted a showcase of community and civic applications , embedded in an evening of food and socializing. Brigade Captain Bradley Holt notes that since this experiment in hosting a more casual event, participation in hack night has greatly increased.

“We’ve had two Hack Nights since the event, and the type of energy we have seen so far has been reinvigorating!” said Holt.

The theme and word for Code for BVTs event was “inclusion,” inspired by the Code for America Principle for 21st Century Government, “make it easy for everyone to participate.” It appears that this theme really resonated with the Brigade’s community.

“There was a significant uptick in participants joining our Meetup leading up to the event,” said Holt. “This was probably in no small part influenced by our partnership with Girl Develop It (GDI) Burlington.  Our hope is that CodeAcross BTV 2015 provided an opportunity to bring in a broader diversity of participants to our Brigade network.”

Aside from the GDI partnership, Bradley says the Brigade’s partnership with event co-hosts ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center is another “thing to watch.” Together these organizations are building Lakecraft, a powerful tool for engaging students in the exploration of real world spatial data and introductory programming.

Want to see more CodeAcross 2015 Tweets, Tumbls, and photos? Check out this Storify.