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Here’s what happened at CodeAcross 2014

Screen Shot 2014-03-10 at 3.50.50 PM

Photo credit Kara Gomez

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Photo credit Kara Gomez

</div>

In 48 communities around the world neighbors came together for CodeAcross 2014 (Feb. 21-23, 2014). During these 72 hours,  50+ event organizers and 2,500+ participants worked together to make a difference in the communities where they live and work.

To everyone who participated in CodeAcross, thank you. These are your accomplishments.

Thanks to Sunlight Foundation and Open Knowledge Foundation for co-hosting and to Microsoft and Esri for making CodeAcross possible.

Network Highlights

  • More than 2,500 people came out and participated in 48 events around the world for CodeAcross.
  • Collectively, these 2, 500 participants spent more than 30,000 hours hacking, yaking, designing, writing, prototyping, opening data, and more. That’s an average of 11+ hours volunteered per participant.

CodeAcross by the Numbers

  • 48 events
  • 11 international events
  • 2,591 participants*
  • 30, 226 volunteer hours*
  • 20 events opened data at CodeAcross*
  • 35 events collaborated with local government*
  • 9 events deployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 2 events redeployed an app at CodeAcross*
  • 15 events launched a Brigade at CodeAcross
  • 21 events developed an app*
  • 21 events pushed code*
  • 21 events advanced open data policy*
  • 24 events participated in the CodeAcross Open Data Inventory*
  • 234 datasets inventoried*
  • 4 events used the Open Data Policy CodeAcross Challenge*
  • 2 events participated in the Scraper CodeAcross Challenge*

*out of 46 events reporting

2013 vs. 2014

  • In 2014, we over doubled the number of CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 22 in 2013 to 48 in 2014.
  • In, 2014, we over tripled the attendance at CodeAcross events from 2013 — from 780 participants in 2013 to 2,591 participants in 2014.

Stories and Press

To more deeply understand the impact of CodeAcross, we looked to organizers, participants,  and press outlets for stories of what happened at each of the local events. And we didn’t have to look far.

Over CodeAcross weekend, the #codeacross activity on Twitter and Tumblr painted a vivid picture of the energy and accomplishments from the weekend. Check out this Storify for a summary of #codeacross.

Event organizers were also excited to share their stories:

  • Miami, FL: “At Miami Open Data Jam, we brainstormed and mapped ideas for an open data policy and prioritizing open data in Miami-Dade County. Developers, journalists, activists, local elected officials, county staff, and a few open data experts showed up to think about these issues and work together on a roadmap for action.”
  • Grand Rapids, MI: “On Friday, the space was filled to capacity with around 75 people, including the city comptroller, a city commissioner, and the City’s director of IT…Jonathan Pichot… unveiled Grand Rapids Open Data, a City-supported community-powered data portal.”
  • St. Louis, MO: “And we made some real progress on our data census for the City of St Louis, giving us some key information to bring back to city government!”

And there was an abundance of local coverage. Check out the press, blogs, and recaps from CodeAcross events around the world.

Have a great blog or article about your CodeAcross event that’s not on this list? Let us know @codeforamerica.

Key Learnings and Next Steps

We asked CodeAcross event organizers to give their CodeAcross experience a letter grade: 76 percent of event organizers gave it an A; 17 percent gave it a B; and 7 percent gave it a C.

The requests for improvement generally fell into three categories: more lead time and notice for CodeAcross; more templates and tools available earlier on; and more flexibility with the dates.

Next up the Brigade is to help track and sustain the momentum out of CodeAcross. A few ways we’ll be doing this is by helping new Brigades continue to grow, inviting CodeAcross participants into the Brigade network, and tracking CodeAcross projects.

Oh, yeah. And we’ll also be applying the lessons we learned from CodeAcross to National Day of Civic Hacking this June. Y’all ready to do this again? We are!